New Premium Feature – Add Parameters to Your Survey Link

December 21, 2009

Zoomerang Premium subscribers now have the option to pass respondent data through the survey URL to capture pre-collected information about your respondents, such as their job function or geographical region, or track additional information about your respondents, such as the website where they clicked the link to take the survey, without needing to ask for this information in the survey.

After you define parameters and launch the survey, you can customize the survey link with unique values for each parameter. When someone clicks the link to access the survey, the parameter value you entered into the survey link will display as the respondent’s answer to the hidden question in your results. Each parameter will display in your results as a hidden question and the unique values you enter for each parameter will display as the responses to that hidden question.

For example: If you want to post a survey on Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter, you can track which site the respondent clicked the link to take your survey. Once you define the parameter and launch the survey, you can include the name of each site in the link you post in each location to help you identify and create reports based on where the respondent accessed your survey.

In addition, once your Zoomerang Premium subscription is mapped to your Salesforce.com account, you can generate Hidden Questions to display in your survey results:

– When you map Salesforce campaign member information to Zoomerang as you deploy a survey to a Salesforce campaign

– When you pass data through the generic survey link as you deploy a survey using the web deployment option:

    – Each parameter you define will display in your results as a hidden question (with the Hidden Question Label you entered)

   – The unique values you entered for each parameter will display as the responses to that hidden question

   – When someone clicks a link to take the survey, the unique parameter value you entered will be captured as the respondent’s response to that hidden question

Respondent data associated with your hidden questions will display (in green boxes to differentiate them from the questions) at the end of your survey questions from the Analyze Results tab similar to the responses to open-ended survey questions.


Cool Beans –Zoomerang Launches Twitter Integration Feature

December 14, 2009

Twitter has been described as a personal news-wire service countless of times and with good reason. Whether it’s updates from friends, family, companies, school administrators, co-workers, brands, or breaking world events, the real-time aspect of sending and receiving Twitter updates is frequently being incorporated into daily life. Twitter’s demographic diversity and geographic reach (not to mention accessibility via a wide range of mobile devices) also makes it an excellent platform for short surveys, especially those requiring immediate feedback.

Zoomerang’s Twitter Integration feature enables you to automatically post a tweet of your survey (including URL) right from the Zoomerang Survey Launch page. By pre-formatting announcements that allow up to 140 characters Zoomerang’s Twitter Integration Feature acts as a Twitter client for your survey, making it a fast and easy way to tweet a respondent request along with the survey URL directly to your followers instantly upon survey deployment.

When you tweet your survey you will also be reaching far beyond your Twitter followers. Along with generous retweets, including keyword hashtags in your survey description will help your survey tweet go viral across the Twitterverse and beyond: In addition to the traditional Google search results, Google Search Appliance is now providing results from Twitter and Bing has also begun indexing tweets.

As social media is becoming a more integral factor to the overall market research feedback loop, Zoomerang subscribers can use URL parameters to segment survey deployments in order to easily segment specific survey groups or targeted deployments. By using a unique code for each audience, Zoomerang subscribers can determine how respondents to a MySpace survey, Facebook poll or Twitter survey compared to respondents in a control group.

Whether you are deploying a short customer satisfaction survey, gathering event feedback, surveying students regarding a school issue or interested in visitor feedback on your blog or website, posting your survey on Twitter can quickly bring you a world of actionable data and by using Zoomerang’s Twitter Integration the online survey process has become even more efficient.


Twitter Surveys – Use Twitter to Tweet Your Survey

December 1, 2009

 

The latest statistics from The Pew Internet & American Life Project’s Twitter and Status Updating (Fall 2009 Report) show that 19% of U S internet users (about one in five Americans) are actively posting updates about themselves using Twitter and other similar service. The latest estimates released by comScore put Twitter’s usage at 58.4 million unique worldwide visitors while eMarketer estimates Twitter will have 26 million domestic users in 2010.

With user numbers rapidly growing, Twitter has become an ocean of market research data just waiting to be explored. The Twitter search function allows you to quickly find mentions of products, services and companies in specific context, acting as a free repository of general and honest conversation where a wide range of information can be gathered.

To gain even more insights you can survey your Twitter followers directly and watch as your survey reaches others in the twitter community through re-tweets and hash tags. Whether you want to test out a new product concept or find out the most popular theme among your friends for a party, Zoomerang is a great tool for both personal and business surveys. You can use the Text Import feature to automatically program your survey to save you time and with Zoomerang you also have the ability to view real-time results of your survey as well as share survey results on your website or blog with friends, colleagues and site visitors.

5 ideas for a Twitter Survey

1. Gather opinions on current events 

2. Get feedback about a recent webinar or podcast

3. Learn what tools people are using to promote their business

4. Ask your friends about their favorite apps

5. Collect feedback on events and conferences

For additional Twitter tips and suggestions be sure to read Chris Brogan’s 50 Ideas on Using Twitter for Business and Select Courses’ 100 Tips, Tools, and Resources for Twitter Research.

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Zoomerang Surveys For Salesforce

November 17, 2009

Zoomerang Surveys for Salesforce, the first integrated online survey solution for the world’s most popular CRM system, was unveiled today at the Salesforce.com® Dreamforce Global Gathering. Zoomerang Surveys for Salesforce combines the convenience and quality of the popular Zoomerang online survey solution with the power of Salesforce.com® providing a new level of customer insight to enhance sales effectiveness, improve customer satisfaction, and boost marketing return on investment. 

Zoomerang Surveys for Salesforce provides Salesforce CRM users with a fast, easy way to field high-quality surveys from within the Salesforce environment.  With this new application, Salesforce leads and contacts can be sourced for online surveys, and Zoomerang Surveys for Salesforce users will have access to a customizable dashboard where survey result metrics can be collected, shared and reviewed among collaborative teams. Since Zoomerang Surveys for Salesforce is fully integrated with Salesforce CRM, users simply sign in to their Salesforce account and run online surveys through a single tab in the Salesforce interface, with access to all of the features found in the Zoomerang online survey tool, including hundreds of pre-built survey templates and automatic import of survey questions from Word or text documents to get you started fast, unlimited questions and responses, customizable survey design, advanced survey logic, and phone support. Advanced reporting and analysis tools such as filters, cross-tabs, charting, one-click statistics, and export to Microsoft PowerPoint or Excel, also come standard. In addition, the application brings data from surveys into Salesforce, so it can be displayed in Salesforce dashboards or reports and easily shared with the team.

Sales and marketing professionals can use Zoomerang Surveys for Salesforce to:

– Optimize the success of marketing campaigns

– Improve the quality of contact records with profiling surveys

– Improve sales and marketing effectiveness through feedback in win-loss surveys

– Survey existing customers to identify customer satisfaction issues and manage these issues through Salesforce Support

Developed in collaboration with Bluewolf, a leading Salesforce.com®  partner and agile consulting firm, the solution will be available in December on the Salesforce AppExchange, where information about Zoomerang Surveys for Salesforce is now live. If you are attending the Dreamforce Global Gathering in San Francisco this week, be sure to stop by the Bluewolf booth and visit Zoomerang to be among the first to view a demonstration of Zoomerang Surveys for Salesforce.

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Halloween 2009 Survey Results

October 30, 2009

 

Halloween 2009 Survey Results                               

                                  Double, double toil and trouble;
                                  Fire burn and cauldron bubble.
                                  Fillet of a fenny snake, 
                                  In the cauldron boil and bake; 
                                  Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
                                  Wool of bat, and tongue of dog, 
                                  Adder’s fork, and blind-worm’s sting, 
                                  
Lizard’s leg, and howlet’s wing,
                                  For a charm of powerful trouble,
                                  Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

                                  – Incantation of the Three Witches, Macbeth

Despite the consecutive steady increase on Halloween spending over the last several years the economy has finally caught up to Halloween, with this year’s trend best summed up as creativity on a budget. According to the National Retail Federation’s 2009 Halloween Consumer Intentions and Actions Survey consumers are expected to spend an average of $56.31 on Halloween, down from $66.54 last year, with total spending expected to reach $4.75 billion. The survey found consumers plan to spend an average of $20.75 on costumes (including children’s and pet’s costumes); $17.99 on candy; $14.54 on decorations and $3.02 on greeting cards. 

To gain further insight into celebration plans for this year, Zoomerang recently conducted an online Halloween survey. The spirit of the holiday (pun intended) is still running strong for respondents, with 71% of respondents planning on celebrating in some form. Holiday plans vary from handing out candy (67%) to attending a costumed work party (9%). With 41% planning on going trick-or-treating, others will be busy visiting pumpkin patches (27%) and haunted houses (18%). For the 54% planning on dressing up, humorous costumes at 19% are the more popular choice over the 11% who are choosing horror-related costumes.

There is good news on the eco-friendly front: 42% will be making their own costumes at home, 18% will be reusing previous costumes, 6% will be going to a used clothing or consignment store and 5% will be borrowing from friends. Only 11% will be buying from a brick and mortar store while 18% will be buying from an online retailer (it is always a good thing to cut down on fuel consumption and CO2 emissions by shopping online).

One thing does remain true each year: Halloween is the perfect time to express your individuality. As for my plans, I tried my best to be creative on a budget while celebrating in an eco-friendly way. With Halloween falling on a Saturday this year, I decided that I will celebrate with a weekend-long Simpsons Treehouse of Horror 20 episode marathon. Oooh, Scaaareeeyyy!Count Floyd

Okay Marge, you hide in the abandoned amusement park. Lisa, the pet cemetery. Bart, spooky roller disco. And I’ll go skinny dipping in that lake where the teens were killed one hundred years ago tonight. –Homer Simpson

Happy Halloween!

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Survey Results Graphs and Charts

October 26, 2009

 

 

Survey Graphs and Charts

In creating a visual representation of your survey results there are a few options to consider so be sure to choose the format that will best illustrates your results.

A survey results pie chart is best for seeing how something is divided among different groups Pie charts show categories of data in proportion to the whole data set. The entire pie acts as the visual representation of the compiled data and each slice represents a different category within. When analyzing pie chart data look for the largest piece to find the most common category and be sure to pay attention to the relative sizes of pieces; some categories may be unexpectedly similar or different in size.

piechart

For a pie chart, the following statistics are calculated:

Mean: The average of all the data points in the series

Maximum: The maximum value (biggest slice) in the series

Minimum: The minimum value (smallest slice) in the series

Sample Size: The number of values (slices) in the series

Range: The maximum value minus the minimum value

Standard Deviation:  Indicates how widely data is spread around the mean

A survey results bar graph makes for easy comparisons. Like pie charts, bar graphs are useful for comparing categories of data where you can have a single category of data or you can beak down the data further into multiple categories for greater depth of analysis.

bargraph

For each bar in the bar graph, the following statistics are useful:

Mean: The average height of all the bars

Maximum: The maximum value (tallest bar) in the series

Minimum: The minimum value (shortest bar) in the series

Sample Size: The number of values (bars) in the series

Range: The maximum value minus the minimum value

Standard Deviation: Indicates how widely data is spread around the mean

For more information on how to get the most from your survey report and improve the way you analyze surveys be sure to read the Survey Results Report post and 10 Tips to Get the Most out of Survey Reporting

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Survey Results Report

October 19, 2009

 

Survey Results Report

The final stage of your survey is the preparation and presentation of the survey results report. This stage is as important as, if not more important than, any other stage in the market research process. Regardless of the care taken in the design and execution of the survey itself, the time and effort expended on your research project could be wasted if the report does not communicate effectively.

The research report is your factual message relying on tables, figures, and graphical displays of various types to clearly communicate the research findings. The report presents actionable data and vital recommendations so that the most informed decisions can be made. Keep in mind there are usually stakeholders involved in the decisions you are trying to make who want to see a visual representation of your survey results and survey analysis.

When building a survey results graph or chart choose the format that best illustrates your results:

– A bar graph makes for easy comparisons

– A pie chart is best for seeing how something is divided among different groups

Analyzing and illustrating your survey results is fast and simple to do with Zoomerang. In just a few clicks you can graph survey results or apply cross-tabulations, filters, and comparison reports. With Zoomerang you can quickly and easily create a survey results graph directly from a question—even with a filter or cross-tabulation applied—and output it to PowerPoint or a PDF making it easy to share information with key stakeholders.

For more information on how to get the most from your survey report and improve the way you analyze surveys be sure to read “10 Tips to Get the Most out of Survey Reporting

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